Breaking Baroque Blog

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February 2018

 
Feb 18, 2018

What goes into a concert poster? Handel Alexander's Feast

by Tim Crouch, Marketing Department

With Handel Alexander's Feast just around the corner (Feb 22-25 at Koerner Hall), we're looking back at poster designs created at the top of the season. As always, our multi-talented Choir director Ivars Taurins provided some inspirational art to help guide the design process, and we're happy to share them with you!

The Family of Darius before Alexander - Paolo Veronese

Feb 13, 2018

Baroque 101: The Triple Harp

By Julia Seager-Scott, harp

Julia Seager-Scott, harp Julia Seager-Scott, harp

The baroque triple harp was one answer to accommodate the expanding musical language that was emerging at the turn of the seventeenth century. Finding a way to make the harp a continuo instrument, capable of playing a figured bass line with accompanying chords in any key, was the main driver behind the drastic changes seen in the harps of this time.

Feb 9, 2018

My Instrument: Julia Wedman and her Jacobs violin

Julia Wedman playing her Jakobs violin at Handel House in London. Julia Wedman playing her Jacobs violin at Handel House in London.

By Julia Wedman

Feb 2, 2018

Baroque 101: The Recorder

“‘Oh the recorders, let me see one.” Hamlet, Act 3 sc. 2

A member of the flute family with relatives in other cultures around the world, the recorder is known to have been in use in Italy by the fourteenth century. The earliest recorders were made from a single piece of wood and came in two sizes. By 1619, the composer and music theorist Michael Praetorius listed eight different sizes, from a small sopranino to a great bass.